Table 2 C. albicans from oak are more heterozygous than most clinical strains from Ropars et al. (2018)
Strain or cladeMTLMean heterozygosity (maximum–minimum)aFiltered length (Mbp)bMean filtered heterozygosityc (maximum–minimum)
NCYC 4146, clade 4Embedded Image0.006211.10.0066
NCYC 4144, clade18Embedded Image0.00619.70.0068
NCYC 4145, unknownEmbedded Image0.007711.40.0078
3 oak strainsd0.006610.70.0070
180 clinical strainsd from 17 clades176Embedded Image,0.0048e (0.0024–0.0071)9.90.0056f (0.0032–0.0073)
3Embedded Image,
1Embedded Image
27 clade 4 strains0.0053 (0.0045–0.0060)10.20.0062 (0.0060–0064)
4 clade 18 strains0.0059 (0.0053–0.0065)10.70.0062 (0.0060–0066)
10 unknown strains0.0057 (0.0048–0.0070)10.50.0063 (0.0054–0071)
  • Rows in bold show data summarized for all 3 oak strains and 180 clinical strains from Ropars et al. (2018).

  • a Heterozygosity was estimated genome-wide (from ∼14 million high-quality sites) for each strain as the proportion of high-quality sites where 20–80% of reads differed from the reference sequence. Where multiple strains are considered, we show the mean, maximum, and minimum levels of genome-wide heterozygosity.

  • b The length of genome sequence after excluding loss of heterozygosity (LOH) regions, known repeats, putatively repetitive regions, and centromeres.

  • c The proportion of heterozygous sites in filtered regions.

  • d Rows in bold show data summarized for all 3 oak strains and 180 clinical strains from Ropars et al (2018).

  • e Clinical strains are less heterozygous than oak strains (Wilcoxon test, Embedded Image).

  • f Wilcoxon test, Embedded Image