TABLE 3

Candidate genes for each QTL based on our data and published evidence—the genes to test first

Evidence
TraitQTLGeneChrMbmRNAaProteinbSequencecLiteratured
HDLHdlq20Apoa21173.14.1XLilja et al. (2002)
Fh1177.5−2.8X
Hsd11b1194.9−3.8Morton et al. (2001)
Hdlq1Acads5115.3−2.6X
Scarb1125.6−2.1Acton et al. (1996)
Hdlq24Pparg6115.4XChinetti et al. (2001)
Rassf4116.6−8.2
Adipor2119.31.9XYamauchi et al. (2003)
Ndufa9126.8−2.6X
Gallstone presenceLith17Scarb2593.6XActon et al. (1996)
Acads115.3−2.6X
Lith19Slc10a285.15.2Shih et al. (2001)
Lith21Ctgf1024.3−2.6XKoninger et al. (2005)
Obesity and body weightObwq3Pparg6115.4XCock et al. (2004)
Rassf4116.6−8.2
Adipor2119.31.9XYamauchi et al. (2003)
Obwq4Pgc1747.2XPuigserver et al. (1998)
Obwq5Atrnl11957.73.4Gunn et al. (1999)
  • Genes listed are in QTL regions that are not identical by descent between SM and NZB (Hsd11b1 maps close to Hldq20). Protein and mRNA fold changes are given where a positive value indicates upregulation and a negative one indicates downregulation in NZB relative to SM.

  • a Fold changes for mRNA are significant (Fs < 1 × 10−4).

  • b Proteins are significantly different as determined by Western analysis (Figure 3), except for APOA2, which is suggestive (P < 0.1) on the basis of MS/MS data.

  • c Genes that contain known or extrapolated codon-changing SNPs leading to potential functional differences are indicated by “X.”

  • d Gene names from supplemental Table S2 were systematically interrogated against the PubMed database using relevant keywords (Stylianou et al. 2006).